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Author Archives: ParksRecreationCollection

Healthy Spaces and Places

Healthy Spaces and Places is a web-based national guide for planning, designing and creating sustainable communities that encourage healthy living.

Foremost it is for planners, as they can help tackle some of Australia’s major preventable health issues by planning places where it is easier and more desirable for more Australians to be active – walking, cycling and using public transport – every day.

But it’s also for everyone who can make a difference to the overall health and well-being of Australians – design professionals, health professionals, the property development industry, governments and the community.

Healthy Spaces and Places supports and complements planning and design initiatives throughout Australia.  It is a single source of easy-to-find, practical information from experts in health, planning, urban design, community safety and transport planning.

This website includes:

Planning for healthier outcomes can be applied to all parts of Australia. It is just as applicable in metropolitan areas as it is in regional cities, towns, villages and remote communities.

For an overview, download Healthy Spaces and Places: a national guide to designing places for healthy living.

The material provided within Healthy Spaces and Places focuses on how to create environments that support physical activity but does not provide in-depth information on nutrition, food security and noise and air pollution.

Healthy Spaces and Places website re-established on PaRC

The material was previously hosted on a dedicated website www.healthyplaces.org.au, but this has since closed down. The Healthy Spaces and Places website is re-established here.

Note 1: References in the website to Adobe Flash Player are obsolete as this program has been withdrawn by Adobe. Please replace with your own image viewer.

Note 2: The Healthy Places website is a stand-alone module and not merged into the Narratives webcode. Consequently the standard search function on the website does not search these pages.

Acknowledgements

This resource was developed by a collaborative team comprising the Australian Local Government Association, the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Planning Institute of Australia and funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. For more information about the people involved in the project please see Acknowledgements. Material provided on this website can be used freely but please acknowledge Healthy Spaces and Places as the source.

Review Status: Pending

Glen Rock Master Plan

When staff of the Land Planning Branch of the Department of Lands, managers of the Regional Open Space System from its commencement in 1994, recommended that the Glen Rock property in the Gatton hinterland be purchased for public purposes, the intended purpose was as a demonstration cattle property. Given its proximity to the metropolis, the range of vegetation types from Creek Flats to mountaintops and the sensitivity of the land to soil erosion, it was considered that it would make an excellent facility to showcase landcare principles and practice. This was consistent with development as a regional park. Continue Reading

Review Status: Pending

Vale John Wood, 1945-2021

John Wood, Life Member of both Parks & Leisure Australia (PLA) and Outdoors Queensland; PLA Fellow; recipient of the PLA Frank Stewart Award (2012) and the Queensland Outdoor Recreation Award for Outstanding Achievement (2003); and retired Owner & Director of John Wood Consultancy Services, passed away in September 2021.

John was a generous, humble, and unassuming gentleman and a legend of the recreation, open space planning and natural area management fraternity in Australia from the mid-1970s. John’s national and international achievements across a wide range of disciplines speak for themselves. Few people can boast both the academic and hands-on project experience that John demonstrated with equal merit over his distinguished career. While he successfully advised government agencies on an array of projects, his passion was outdoor recreation where his expertise has been sought in tourism planning, national park planning, open space planning, master planning, trails, and natural resource planning. John’s specialist expertise has been acknowledged by several major local government agencies who have engaged him as an expert witness in complex cases involving open space and recreation matters.

John was born in Laidley, Queensland and grew-up in the Brisbane suburb of Camp Hill, exploring the then-wilderness of what is known today as Seven Hills Bushland Reserve and Whites Hill Reserve. While devoted to his family, John also selflessly volunteered his time as an advocate on many government, professional, academic and community bodies; and to present or facilitate at conferences where he has shared his knowledge and expertise. He devoted a lifetime of commitment to promoting and supporting the leisure industry and in the various professional roles he has held throughout his career, has served as a mentor for many. John Wood was a role model of professionalism and credibility in the leisure industry and a greatly respected consultant; his trademark was personified in his qualities of integrity, honesty, and humility. In John’s own words “Be positive, dream big, give it your all, learn from your mistakes.”

John was closely involved with the development of the Parks and Recreation Collection from its genesis. As convener of the Research group of PLA, he welcomed the advent of the Collection as a repository for the large volume of scholarly knowledge materials that he had accumulated over the years, notably the Research Connections series of annotated bibliographies. Also, as a long-standing senior member of PLA, he was integral to the steps taken to ensure that PaRC would meet the needs of PLA for archiving its own documentary knowledge. By celebrating John’s life here, the site is serving one of its purposes of keeping alive the knowledge and insights of the ‘greats’ of the profession.

 

John’s passing is a great loss to the parks and leisure sector and he will be deeply missed.

This account of John and his work is adapted from a newsletter of Parks and Leisure Australia.

Review Status: Pending

Theatrecraft in Victoria

Theatre and Melbourne

As Melbourne continued to develop following the gold rush years in the 1850s, theatre burst into life in the city and has continued to flourish, making Melbourne and regional Victorian cities the most active in Australia. As a result, we have an abundance of architecturally well-designed theatres across the state, providing space for the entrepreneurial spirit which prevails here.

Community theatre

Similarly, a passion for performance community theatre continues, with the spread of companies to outer suburbs and country areas. The consequent involvement of these communities is reflected in the major events staged throughout the year in addition to ongoing programs. Ostensibly a leisure time pursuit, but one that a large population takes seriously, devoting endless time and energy to it, in the pursuit of high standards.

The Victorian Drama League

Established in 1952 to support the community theatre world, The Victorian Drama League (VDL) has members comprising theatre companies, play reading groups, schools, one-act play festivals as well as individual members. While the major proportion of its members are from Victoria it has a growing membership in all states and territories. Access to an extensive library of plays, reference books and tapes is one of many services it provides to its members. The VDL publishes online https://vdl.org.au , featuring reviews of members’ productions, as well as news and notices of interest to the community theatre world.

Standards

Bruce Cochrane, VDL President 2015 to present writes:

“In the forty plus years I have been involved in community theatre, I have observed the constant pursuit of excellence, which is celebrated in our annual Awards Event. In the future, I see more well trained and enthusiastic people of all ages stepping up to be a part of the wonderful family of community theatre”.

Further reading

Dr Cheryl Threadgold’s In the Name of Theatre: The History, Culture and Voices of Amateur Theatre in Victoria of 2020 first outlines the history of amateur theatre in Victoria, from the 18th century in New South Wales to the modern day. In Part 2 the culture and voices of amateur theatre are shared in individual stories from 129 musical and non-musical amateur theatre companies currently operating in urban and regional Victoria.

Known past amateur theatre companies in Victoria are listed to pay tribute to their existence, and some research data collated from interviews with representatives from 70 theatre companies, giving insight into the transformative benefits of amateur theatre, and perceived strengths, threats and weaknesses of companies.

ISBN 978-0-646-81339-4. Available from the book’s website.

 

Review Status: Pending

Mt Neurum – Mt Archer, SEQ

Mt Neurum

After the launch of the Regional Open Space System (ROSS) in South East Queensland in mid-1994, the ROSS office based in the Department of Lands had some $4 million per annum (budgeted for five years) to spend on land purchase. A private allotment covering much of Mount Neurum, a prominent outcrop at the end of the D’Aguilar Range overlooking Woodford, came on the market. Staff assessed it as being of high value for regional open space, because of its prominence in the landscape and because a subdivision design for some 20 allotments high on the rise, each necessitating a long steep driveway, was in existence.

The property was purchased by the State and eventually Caboolture Shire Council took management.

Mt Archer

A privately-owned, dog-friendly recreation park was established on private freehold land near to Mt Neurum, abutting Neurum Creek. More details on this innovative facility to come.

Review Status: Pending

Support the PaRC project

 

The PaRC narratives and document repository have been established using philanthropic funds. For administrative reasons tax deductibility for the AIPR Trust Fund – Education expired in 2000. The Fund’s bank account can still receive donations (BSB 064-448, Account 10327037) which will be warmly welcomed, but donors will not be able to claim a tax deduction. However, Charles Sturt University has a fund that enjoys tax deductibility.

While the basic architecture of the library has been completed, there is a large potential for enlarging the collections using sponsored funds. For example, a sponsor may choose to pay for the cost of digitising historical documents in their sphere of interest that have fallen out of public view.  Local governments may support establishment of a page for their parks and recreation activities. The professional papers of eminent park personnel of mature age or who have passed away can be digitised using funds from their families.

Any sponsor or philanthropist who would like to contribute to this inspiring project is invited to make contact via secretary@parcaustralia.com.au.

Review Status:

Open Space Planning in SEQ – 1994-2012

More than 25 years after the creation of a regional open space network was recommended in the SEQ2001 Regional Plan, South East Queensland does not have a regional park system or any coordinated network of recreational open space worth the name. The narrative of what-might-have-been is a story of opportunities lost, at least three times over. Continue Reading

Review Status: Pending

Vale David Vial, IOSS

The parks and recreation profession lost one of its leading lights with the passing on 21 March 2020 of David Vial, Principal of IOSS, Integrated Open Space Services after an extended illness. David was a member of the steering committee that oversaw the strategic planning for the PaRC project. David  supported the PaRC initiative throughout and generously gave password access to his database of significant documents.

In 2008 IOSS commenced a collaborative program with Parks and Leisure Australia termed Parks Base. Parks Base is a web-based portal that collects, organises and reports on information about public open space planning and management. Parks Base is for local, regional, national and international use. There are two subsets:

Knowledge Base, an online database for professionals in the fields of public open space, urban greenery, urban ecology, conservation and protected areas, land management, arboriculture, horticulture, soils, turf, recreation and sport; and associated areas of sustainability and social research. Registration is required.

Comparison Program, a commercial program that enables monitoring of aspects of public open space planning and management by participating government authorities. Registration is required.

The IOSS website includes an index of a substantial body of publications and “Public Realm Research Projects” produced by David and his team. PaRC will endeavour to perpetuate his contribution to the profession by offering access to a selected body of his work.

Continue Reading

Review Status: Completed

A Short History of the AIPR Trust Fund-Education

When the Australian Institute of Parks and Recreation (predecessor to Parks and Leisure Australia) established a Trust Fund – Education on 8 February 1974, it had no particular project in mind, but a general desire that the Institute should make a long-term investment in the future of the parks and recreation professions.

Continue Reading

Review Status: